More PDF Field guides for Master Naturalists

by Carl Cole, Class of Spring 2013

Here are a few more PDF field guides and other documents:
 
Strictly speaking, Bats of the Savannah River Site and Vicinity is about that particular location but it actually serves as a decent guide to bats inSouth Carolina.  The text for each species discusses its range throughout the state and includes a map showing which South Carolina counties have confirmed sightings.

Bats of the Savannah River Site and Vicinity
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/gtr/gtr_srs068.pdf

Although the title Field Guide to Common Macrofungi in Eastern Forests and Their Ecosystem Functions suggests applicability to our area, it may be more applicable to the Northeast than the Southeast.   Nonetheless, it’s a great little document, with an introductory discussion of “Mushroom Basics” that is followed by one-page-per-species descriptions with photos.

Note the warning in the guide’s introduction:  “Although we provide information about edibility in this guide, DO NOT eat any mushroom unless you are absolutely certain of its identity: many mushroom species look alike and some species are highly poisonous.”

Field Guide to Common Macrofungi in Eastern Forests and Their Ecosystem Functions
http://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/pubs/gtr/gtr_nrs79.pdf

On the other hand, Field Guide to the Freshwater Mussels of South Carolina is quite specific to our location.  It also has a nice introductory discussion that is followed by one-page-per-species descriptions with photos.

Field Guide to the Freshwater Mussels of South Carolina
http://www.fws.gov/charleston/pdf/South%20Carolina%20Mussel%20Field%20Guide.pdf

The black and white illustrations in Familiar Trees of South Carolina are not as nice as color photos but the guide itself is still a very useful little document.

Familiar Trees of South Carolina
http://www.clemson.edu/extfor/publications/bul117/bul117.pdf

Each of these last two field guides – Aleiodes Wasps of Eastern Forests: A Guide to Parasitoids and Associated Mummified Caterpillars and Guide to the Siricid Woodwasps of North America – has a very narrow scope, that is, a specific group of wasps, but they are very interesting.

Aleiodes Wasps of Eastern Forests: A Guide to Parasitoids and Associated Mummified Caterpillars
http://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/technology/pdfs/AleiodesBookWeb.pdf

Guide to the Siricid Woodwasps of North America
http://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/technology/pdfs/GuideSiricidWoodwasps.pdf

These last two groups of documents – NSF documents and Clemson student publications – are not field guides nor even entirely limited to natural history, but they contain content of potential interest to naturalists.

Ray Ward posted a link to Long Term Ecologoical Research (LTER) Discovery Articles on Facebook and that link led to a National Science Foundation Publications website.

Long Term Ecologoical Research (LTER) Discovery Articles
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13083/nsf13083.pdf?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

National Science Foundation Publications
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/

Clemson has two student publications – Decipher and Tigra scientifica – that are available online in PDF format.   Both contain short, quick-read articles about student research projects.  Here are links to current issues:

Deciper Fall 2012
http://www.clemson.edu/ci/assets/documents/Decipher2012.pdf

Tigra scientifica Fall 2012
http://www.clemson.edu/ci/upload/uploads/ci/376-Tigra%20Scientifca%20Fall%202012.pdf